Who knew motorcycle schools had 50% off sales?

Take a Motorcycle Rider Course for 50% off

If you are in NYC and want to take a motorcycle rider course now, read this and save some cash.

I ran across this “coupon” just today and thought I would share for those of us New Yorkers that still want to get on a bike this year.  C’mon, suck it up, it ain’t cold yet.

The deal is for 50% off a “Introductory Motorcycle Experience” at the Motorcycle Safety School of New York (specifically, for Bronx, Brooklyn, Staten Island and thereabouts).  So, you’ll get the intro course for $45 instead of $90.  Not a bad deal.

Now, the site that has this deal posted (here’s the link, by the way –> MSSNYCDeal) says the deal has expired.  But, take a look at the bottom in the THE FINE PRINT.

 

 

Given that I read English pretty well, I think it’s good through October 26th (or the 10th of 26 month, so either way . . .).

So, I’d go for it.  Call up MSS at this number 1-718-599-1079 and use the discount code they provide, Daily News, and get yourself a discount.

Leave a comment below if you hook up this deal.  Would love to hear someone took advantage of this deal.  Actually, come back and tell me if they DON’T honor the deal.  I might have to make note of that somehow.

What does Consumer Reports know about motorcycle safety?

Deer in Road Motorcycle Safety PromotionRecently, Consumer Reports published a great post for new motorcycle riders (and those that haven’t been on 2 wheels for a while).  You can find the link to the post at the bottom of the page.

We’d thought we net some of the highlights of the article here.  The full article is worth a read, however.

Key Motorcycling Stats (as published in the article):

  • motorcyclists are 30 times more likely to die in a crash than people in a car (says the Insurance Institute for Highway Safety; and there are some other great stats here)
  • riders over 60 years old are 3x more likely to be hospitalized after a crash than younger riders (though we guess this is similar for car drivers who are “over age”)
  • speeding was a factor in forty-eight percent of fatalities in 2010 (also according to the Insurance Institutewhere alcohol played a role in forty-two percent.

Tips (as published in the article):

Don’t buy more bike than you can handle

  • Today’s small engines pack a punch vs. the old “two-strokers” (as my wife calls them).  Old dudes beware.
  • Get a bike that fits and that you can manage (i.e. get off the ground when you fall over).
  • editor’s note: We have written some about “best bikes for beginners” so check out our stuff too.

Invest in anti-lock brakes.

  • Don’t be too cool.  Anti-lock brakes are a proven lifesaver and the Insurance Institute data show that bikes that had ABS brakes were 37 percent less likely to be involved in a fatal crash than bikes without it.
  • Why?  Not locking up your brakes when you grab a fistful of lever, helping you to maintain bike control.

Hone your skills.

  • editor’s note: We LOVE this one.  You can check out all our info on riding courses near you by going to the home page or our riding school section and finding your U.S. state or country.
  • A Motorcycle Safety Foundation course or similar class will teach you the basic and advanced riding techniques, like evasive emergency maneuvers.
  • An approved motorcycle safety course may make you eligible for an insurance discount
  • You could get to skip the road test section of your licensing exam

Use your head

  • editor’s note: We are 100% helmet believers and we make no excuses for this.
  • Riders without a helmet are 40 percent more likely to suffer a fatal head injury in a crash and are 3x more likely to suffer brain injuries than those with helmets, according to government studies.
  • Go full-face helmet (preferably SNELL approved); not cool halfsies or Colonel Klink.  One great sign spotted in a gear shop once: “Buy a half-face helmet and get free jaw wire!”

Wear the right gear

  • Want road-rash?  Great.  Ride in shorts, flip-flops and a backwards baseball cap.
  • If not, get the right gear.  Be safe.  Go for leather or some type of reinforced synthetic (nylon, kevlar, etc.).
  • Wear gloves.  First thing to hit the pavement is often a hand.  
  • Protect your eyes.  You’ll never ride again, for sure, if you can’t see.

Be defensive

  • in collisions involving a motorcycle and a car, car drivers were at fault 60 percent of the time (per a study by the University of South Florida’s Center for Urban Transportation Research).
  • This is where a riding school will help you learn to ride defensively; to plan ahead; to protect yourself from the “cages”.  

Avoid bad weather and watch for road hazards (duh)

  • Yes, it is possible to ride in bad conditions.  check out our post here with super cool video.
  • However, slippery conditions are a risk. Rain cuts your visibility and reduces the tire grip on the road.  If you must ride in rain (or snow, yes, which can be done).  Don’t go out right away.  Let some rain wash the oil residue off the roads and go out 10-15 minutes after rain starts.
  • “crap” on the road is a problem, be it sand, leaves or pebbles.  These things can cause your bike to low side (slide out from under you).  Be aware and be careful.

Link to original articleat: Consumer Reports

U.S. Motorcycle License Practice Tests

Pass Your Motorcycle Permit/License Test

You want to pass your motorcycle license exam the first time?

Of course.  And we want to help.

The heart of what we do here at Motorcycle Driving School Cafe is help you go the legal and safe route to motorcycling.

We’ve published a bunch of info about getting licenses across the U.S. and other countries, including help for passing your motorcycle license exam or permit exam.  But a lot is spread out across the MotoSchoolCafe site.  So, we consolidated here on this post some of the basic info on motorcycle license (motorcycle permit) practice tests and study guides.  It’s a little bit repeating other info found on this site, but consolidated in one place.

Here’s the basics:

The Full Monty from IDriveSafely

First, we have found a great company helping soon-to-be motorcycle riders with passing their license exams in the U.S.

These folks, over at IDriveSafely, have made state-specific exams to help you pass your U.S. motorcycle license test and to avoid future trips to the DMV.  (You may know that happened to me when i went for my motorcycle license ‘renewal’ after holding a motorcycle license for 15+ years and failing the written test during the license renewal.  I know what I’m talking about here!  Unfortunately . . . )

IDriveSafely has available 2 levels of license practice exams – a 50 question test and a 100 question test. What they’re offering is a real multi-media course – audio and video, practice exam, solutions and explanations. It’s all there.

You can study one question at a time or take complete virtual tests – a read-and-review study guide and unlimited practice tests.

If you are looking for an easy, effective, and practical way to study, these guys have what you need.  The study review is your comprehensive guide through the material, question by question. The practice test gives you a graded score which allows you to practice taking the actual exam and monitor your progress as you go.

And they have a guarantee.

This is a full program and, heads-up! – these are for ALL drivers and riders. The materials are targeted to include knowledge of your state traffic laws and rules of the road and are not just focused on motorcycle specific knowledge.

Only Motorcycle from MotorcycleDrivingSchoolCafe

So, Second, this is where our exclusive and custom study guide, Crush Your License Exam, becomes a great companion – iDriveSafely will help you get brain strong on your state traffic laws and rules of the road and Motorcycle Driving School Cafe will make sure you master the specifics of the motorcycle license exam questions.

To check out the full driver program from iDriveSafely click on your U.S. state below.  These links will take you over to the order page for the full 100 question program.  It’s a small price, really, to pay for some great training and insurance for passing your exam.

Alabama Hawaii Massachusetts New Mexico South Dakota
Alaska Idaho Michigan New York Tennessee
Arizona Illinois Minnesota North Carolina Texas
Arkansas Indiana Mississippi North Dakota Utah
California Iowa Missouri Ohio Vermont
Colorado Kansas Montana Oklahoma Virginia
Connecticut Kentucky Nebraska Oregon Washington
Delaware Louisiana Nevada Pennsylvania West Virginia
Florida Maine New Hampshire Rhode Island Wisconsin
Georgia Maryland New Jersey South Carolina Wyoming

Now, check out Crush Your License Exam for building that bullet proof motorcycle knowledge.

Click on the image below and get the overview – you’ll be amazed at how we’ve priced this great study guide just to make sure you get all the help you can to pass your license exam.

Motorcycle License Exam Study Guide

 

 

 

 

 

Good Luck!

Keep us updated with your progress on your motorcycle license.  We’d love to publish your success on this page.  Come back and leave a comment on the post when you are a licensed rider!

The Single Most Important Piece of Motorcycle Equipment?

Good Gear – Get Your Head Into It!

Wondering what should be your most important piece of motorcycle riding gear?

Well, since you are on this site, you may know we are all about safe motorcycle riding.  That includes learning to ride properly, getting a motorcycle license (riding legally) and wearing the correct gear.

We found this great overview from the Motorcycle Industry Council on why to wear a helmet (prevention of risk and head safety), features of a good helmet and how to fit one properly.

Just like a good helmet, the 5 minutes of this video is great insurance for you.

 There are also 5 great messages for rider from the MIC (sound familiar?):

  1. Get trained and licensed
  2. Wear protective gear, all the time, including a DOT approved helmet
  3. Ride sober
  4. Ride within your own skill limits
  5. Take refresher courses

Hope you find this valuable.  Leave a comment below and let us know what you think.